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Margaret Ball EDMT 380.03 Fall 2004

Project Two

Storyboard/Script

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A Look Into the Past: The Life of a Homesteader

Scene 1.

TEXT:
Certain images and motion media included in this video fall under the Fair Use exemption of the U.S. Copyright Law. They have been prepared according to the educational multimedia fair use guidelines and are restricted from further use.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
White text on black background.

FADE IN
FADE OUT

Scene 2.
TEXT:
"Uncle Sam is rich enough to give us all a farm."
Christopher W. Czajka

STILL PHOTOS:
Photo of the text of the Homestead Act Bill.

Photo of Abraham Lincoln.

Photo of Prairie and Log Cabin from a distance.

SOUND:
Soft music reminiscent of the time period playing in the background.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Text made in Photo Shop.

FADE IN

NARRATOR:
"In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act into law. The act opened up western public land for settlement by private citizens. Many people took up this offer of free land and 270 million acres, or 10% of the area was claimed."

 

FADE OUT

Scene 4.
TEXT:
The Homestead Act: Life and Times

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Text made in Photo Shop

FADE IN
 
FADE OUT

Scene 4.
TEXT:
Captions of photos

STILL PHOTO:
Photo of Daniel Freeman, the "first homesteader" in Beatrice, Nebraska, 1863.

CUT

Photo of Freeman's family.

CUT

Photo of Freeman's Homestead.

CUT

Photos of Homesteads cut in and out.

SOUND:
Stop music

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Captions will be added through Photo Shop to all photos.

FADE IN

NARRATOR:
"For many Americans the frontier represented hope in the chance for a new beginning. The Homestead Act gave Americans the opportunity to leave large, crowded cities and to own their own land."

"To be eligible for the 160 acres of free land, you had to be at least 21 years old, live on the land, build a home, make improvements, and farm for 5 years before they could take legal possession."

FADE OUT

Scene 5.
VIDEO:
Show video of the inside of a Log Cabin as well as the outside and the animals

SOUND:
Music reminiscent of the time.


FADE IN
NARRATOR:
"Because sometimes wood was scarce, and homes were built by hand with limited resources, homes were usually one room cabins. All the living was done in that one space; cooking, eating, sleeping and visiting. Family roles were played out within this one room home. The men worked with their hands, making or mending things such as harnesses, tools, cleaning their guns, or pouring lead for their bullets. Women prepared food, cleaned, sewed, and mended. Daughters babysat their younger siblings and helped their mothers with the chores. Sons watched and listened to the men and did manual tasks."
FADE OUT

Scene 6.

STILL PHOTO:
Photos of actual letters sent by Homesteader's to their families about their homestead cut in and out according to the letter read.

Photos of supplies necessary for starting a Homestead cut in and out.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Photos will be distributed amongst letters that they relate to.

FADE IN
NARRATOR:
Snipts of letters will be read focusing on the supplies needed for their Homestead.
FADE OUT

Scene 7.

STILL PHOTO:
Photos of the Homesteads as they look today cut in and out.

SOUND:
Stop music

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Photos will be edited in Photo Shop to the correct size.

FADE IN
NARRATOR:
"Remains of this time still exist today. Although the buildings have aged, you can still see what life was like for the Homesteaders in the late 1800's."
FADE OUT

Scene 8.

TEXT:
Written and Produced by Nate Klinger, Margaret Ball, and Amanda Patterson
Narrator: Nate Klinger
Fall, 2004

SOUND:
Start music reminiscent of the time period.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Standard rolling credits, white text over black background.

FADE IN

 

Scene 9.

TEXT:
References/Citations/Sources listed

SOUND:
End Music.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
White text over black background

 
 

FADE TO BLACK

HOLD 5 SECONDS

END

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| Draft Lesson/Unit Plan Outline | Treatment | Storyboard/Script | Final Lesson/Unit Plan Outline |

| Main | Project One | Project Two |

 

Date Updated December 10, 2004
Contact me at Ballma@uwec.edu